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March 24, 2017 / iDriveWarships

Surface Force Battle “E” Winners Announced

 

battle ECommander, Naval Surface Forces (SURFOR) announced March 14 that 36 surface ships and four Littoral Combat Ship crews have earned Battle Effectiveness Awards for calendar year 2016. The awards are a direct reflection of the Sailors’ hard work and dedication to the ship and their role in the Surface Force.

Commonly known as the Battle “‘E”, the award is coveted amongst U.S. Navy vessels as it recognizes the ships and crews that best exemplify readiness and their capability to perform assigned wartime tasking. It also acknowledges a command’s demonstrated ability to perform efficiently in an operational environment and sustain overall superior performance in each department.

Vice Admiral Tom Rowden, Commander, Naval Surface Forces/Naval Surface Force, U.S. Pacific Fleet, announced the winners via naval message traffic and expressed his gratitude to 2016 Battle “E” recipients in the fleet-wide message.

“Congratulations to all award winners,” Rowden wrote. “Your success in meeting mission area excellence standards is noted with pleasure.”

The annual award is given to ships, submarines, and other Navy units that display the highest standards of performance during a yearlong evaluation cycle that assesses the readiness of the command to carry out required missions. To qualify for Battle “E” consideration, a surface ship must win at least four of the five Command Excellence Awards categories throughout the competitive period. Categories include: Maritime Warfare (Black “E”), Engineering/Survivability (Red “E”), Command and Control (Green “E”), Logistics Management (Blue “E”), and CNSF Ship Safety (Yellow “E”).

However, the Battle “E” isn’t just a unit award. Each Sailor who belonged to a winning command during the 2016 competition period is now eligible to wear a Battle “E” ribbon on their uniform. Sailors assigned to this year’s winning ships, who already have a Battle “E” award from a previous awarded command, can now add an additional “E” device to the ribbon.

Each Sailor serving aboard the Battle “E” winning commands can be proud that they’ve made a direct impact on the Surface Fleet’s readiness and ability to provide prompt and sustained combat operations at sea if called upon.

Congratulations to the Surface Force winners of 2016 Battle Effectiveness Awards!

Commander, Naval Surface Force, U.S. Pacific Fleet: 

USS AmericaUSS Bonhomme RichardUSS BoxerUSS Bunker HillUSS ChancellorsvilleUSS Chung-HoonUSS Curtis WilburUSS DextrousUSS GladiatorUSS Green BayUSS GridleyUSS Makin IslandUSS McCampbellUSS Mobile BayUSS PatriotUSS PinckneyUSS PrincetonUSS SampsonUSS San DiegoUSS SpruanceLCS Crew 103LCS Crew 206LCS Crew 212

Commander, Naval Surface Force, U.S. Atlantic Fleet: 

USS AnzioUSS BataanUSS GravelyUSS Iwo JimaUSS MasonUSS MitscherUSS MonsoonUSS New YorkUSS PorterUSS RamageUSS San AntonioUSS San JacintoUSS The SullivansUSS SquallUSS TruxtunUSS ZephyrLCS Crew 208

 

March 17, 2017 / iDriveWarships

Copeman Award Winners Announced

SAN DIEGO (March 15, 2017) Vice Adm. Tom Rowden, commander, Naval Surface Force, U.S. Pacific Fleet, presents the 2016 Vice Admiral Thomas H. Copeman III Material Readiness Award to commanding officer, Cmdr. Joshua Menzel and the crew of Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Spruance (DDG 111). The award is given to ships for high levels of performance during material inspections, and recognizes the crew’s efforts. The award was named for Copeman, a former commander of SURFPAC, who believed that material readiness was the foundation to the Navy’s warfighting ability. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd 2nd Class Zachary Bell/Released) 170315-N-MB306-130

SAN DIEGO (March 15, 2017) Vice Adm. Tom Rowden, commander, Naval Surface Force, U.S. Pacific Fleet, presents the 2015 Vice Admiral Thomas H. Copeman III Material Readiness Award to commanding officer, Cmdr. Joshua Menzel and the crew of USS Spruance (DDG 111). The award is given to ships for high levels of performance during material inspections, and recognizes the crew’s efforts. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd 2nd Class Zachary Bell/Released) 170315-N-MB306-130

Congratulations to USS Mobile Bay (CG 53) and USS Spruance (DDG 111) for winning the annual Vice Admiral Thomas H. Copeman III Material Readiness Award for calendar year 2015.

PACIFIC OCEAN (Feb. 09, 2016) The guided-missile cruiser USS Mobile Bay (CG 53) sails the Pacific Ocean operating as part of the Great Green Fleet. Providing a combat-ready force to protect collective maritime interests, Mobile Bay is assigned to the Stennis strike group, and is currently on a regularly scheduled Western Pacific deployment. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Marcus L. Stanley/Released) 160209-N-MJ645-047

PACIFIC OCEAN (Feb. 09, 2016) USS Mobile Bay (CG 53) sails the Pacific Ocean operating as part of the Great Green Fleet. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Marcus L. Stanley/Released) 160209-N-MJ645-047

The award focuses on recognizing not only the material condition of the ship but also the hard work required of the crew to maintain that condition of excellence.

“USS Mobile Bay and USS Spruance’s superb performance during their MCI [Material Condition Inspection] reflected a strong commitment to establishing and maintaining a shipboard culture of material readiness,” said Vice Admiral Tom Rowden, commander, Naval Surface Force U.S. Pacific Fleet (SURFPAC). “Their steady strain approach, pride in ownership, and self-sufficiency ensured their ships were kept consistently materially fit to fight. Congratulations!”

Named after a former SURFPAC commander who believed that material readiness was the foundation to the Navy’s warfighting ability, Rowden got the idea for the award shortly after taking command. A brief time later the annual Vice Admiral Thomas H. Copeman III Material Readiness Award was borne. It’s made up of two categories: young ships – those less than 15 years old, and the ships requiring additional work to maintain – those more than 15 years old.

SAN DIEGO (Nov. 14, 2016) The guided-missile destroyer USS Spruance (DDG 111) arrives at Naval Base San Diego after completing a seven-month deployment. Spruance, along with guided-missile destroyers USS Decatur (DDG 73) and USS Momsen (DDG 92), deployed in support of maritime security and stability in the Indo-Asia-Pacific region as part of the inaugural U.S. 3rd Fleet Pacific Surface Action Group under Commander, Destroyer Squadron (CDS) 31. (U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Chelsea D. Daily/Released) 161114-N-GR718-085

SAN DIEGO (Nov. 14, 2016) USS Spruance (DDG 111) arrives at Naval Base San Diego after completing a seven-month deployment. (U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Chelsea D. Daily/Released) 161114-N-GR718-085

Recognizing the recently announced calendar year 2015 winners, USS Mobile Bay was awarded top honors in the ships older than 15 category and USS Spruance was given top honors in the ships younger than 15 years category.

Previous Vice Adm. Thomas H. Copeman III Material Readiness Award winners include the inaugural calendar year 2014 awardees, USS Champion (MCM 4) and USS Sampson (DDG 102).

March 10, 2017 / iDriveWarships

Littoral Combat Ship Core Crews and Mission Detachments Merge

SAN DIEGO (March 3, 2017) USS Jackson (LCS 6) is pierside during sunset. Jackson is an Independence-variant littoral combat ship homeported in San Diego. (U.S. Navy photo by Lt. Miranda V. Williams/Released) 170301-N-BL450-011

SAN DIEGO (March 3, 2017) USS Jackson (LCS 6) is pierside during sunset. Jackson is an Independence-variant littoral combat ship homeported in San Diego. (U.S. Navy photo by Lt. Miranda V. Williams/Released) 170301-N-BL450-011

By: Ens. Emily Judstra, Commander, Littoral Combat Ship Squadron One Public Affairs

The Littoral Combat Ship (LCS) program completed the first nine core crew and mission package detachment mergers this month. The mergers are being implemented based on recommendations made during a 2016 Chief of Naval Operations-directed review of the LCS program; merging the core crew and mission detachment crew into a single crew of 70 Sailors will improve enlisted rating utilization, create crew stability, and reduce complexity for LCS Sailors.

“The merger enables our Sailors to become experts in their mission areas and assigned duties while minimizing the potential for Sailor burn-out we saw in the initial minimal manning concept,” said Lt. Cmdr. Justin Golson, director of mission packages at Littoral Combat Ship Squadron One.

The initial LCS operational concept called for minimally manned crews to rotate on and off hull, while being supplemented by modular mission packages and accompanying rotating mission package detachments. The review team determined ships should retain a single-mission focus and merge core crews and mission detachments, promoting increased stability, ownership, reliability and operational capability.

PACIFIC OCEAN (December 8, 2016) The littoral combat ship USS Independence (LCS 2) steams off the coast of San Diego. (U.S. Navy Photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Ace Rheaume) 161208-N-SI773-0442

PACIFIC OCEAN (December 8, 2016) The littoral combat ship USS Independence (LCS 2) steams off the coast of San Diego. (U.S. Navy Photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Ace Rheaume) 161208-N-SI773-0442

“This merger does change the concept of operations for littoral combat ships operating forward, however it does not decrease the operational capability of the ships,” said Golson.

Although the crew-detachment merger has LCS crews transitioning toward a single mission focus, the LCS program, as a whole, will retain its modularity. In the event that a different mission package is required for an operational requirement, either an entirely different configured LCS will be employed, or the original designated ship will embark a new mission package and appropriately qualified crew.

As the LCS program steps into a new realm of operations, Commander, Littoral Combat Ship Squadron One, Capt. Jordy Harrison said that the future of the LCS program looks promising.

“The commitment and dedication to the success of the program is stronger than ever and we are continually looking for ways to improve,” said Harrison. “The mission detachment and core crew merger is just the first in many steps to ensure that LCS becomes the fast, agile, and lethal fighting force that is was designed to be. This is not the beginning of the end, but the end of the beginning for one our Navy’s newest and most exciting ship classes.”

All LCS crew and detachment mergers are scheduled for completion by 2021.

 

 

March 3, 2017 / iDriveWarships

You Belong Here: Reflections on a recent Littoral Combat Ship Crew-Detachment Merger

Guest Blog By Commander Emily Bassett, commanding officer, PCU Manchester (LCS 14)

Commander Emily Bassett Commanding Officer - LCS Crew 214

Commander Emily Bassett, Commanding Officer – LCS Crew 214

“You belong here.”

That was my answer when a junior officer asked me, “What would you tell your junior self, if you could go back in time?” We were participants in a National Naval Officers Association-sponsored “Flag/CO/XO speed-mentoring” session.

I had never heard the question before, and I thought it was an insightful one.

“You belong here,” is what first came to my mind.

If I could have convinced Ensign Emily, Lieutenant Junior Grade Emily, Lieutenant Emily, Lieutenant Commander Emily, and even Commander Emily that, “You belong here,” I would have saved myself a lot of energy and lost a lot less sleep over my career. How much time did I spend trying to convince myself and others that I belonged where I was? Throughout my career, I reported to new jobs, convinced the Navy had detailed me beyond my level of capability. I thought I had to prove to those whom I led and those who led me that I belonged where I was, doing what I was doing.

SAN DIEGO (Nov. 10, 2016) Cmdr. Emily Bassett, commanding officer, littoral combat ship (LCS) crew 214, give the opening remarks during the LCS crew 214 commissioning ceremony. The crew is scheduled to board the littoral combat ship USS Manchester (LCS 14) in the coming months for training. (U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Christopher A. Veloicaza/Released) 161010-N-FV739-067

SAN DIEGO (Nov. 10, 2016) Cmdr. Emily Bassett, commanding officer, littoral combat ship (LCS) crew 214, give the opening remarks during the LCS crew 214 commissioning ceremony. The crew is scheduled to board the littoral combat ship USS Manchester (LCS 14) in the coming months for training. (U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Christopher A. Veloicaza/Released) 161010-N-FV739-067

Belonging. That’s exactly how a mineman senior chief framed his feelings earlier that day about the pending “crew-det merger” for littoral combat ships. His mine countermeasures detachment (MCM Det 5) was merging with my crew (LCS Crew 214). Together, we would be the crew to commission USS Manchester (LCS 14).

 

As part of a larger Chief of Naval Operations-directed plan affecting each crew and each detachment, on Jan. 31, commodore, LCSRON ONE, signed a directive stating that the 20 Sailors of MCM Det 5 would no longer serve as a separate “detachment.” LCS Crew 214’s new organizational charts and watchbill qualifications would integrate billets and watchstations for these mine countermeasures Sailors together with the original Crew 214 Sailors. As a pre-commissioning crew, we know the work we have cut out for ourselves and we welcome the additional Sailors.

I offered my support to the mineman senior chief and asked him, “How can I make sure I do right by you and by the Sailors of the mine warfare specific ratings?” We are a pre-commissioning crew and are over a year away from getting mine warfare gear on board.

“Ma’am,” he told me, “we will manage around that. It’s just nice to belong to a crew.”

Belonging. It also means to be part of a team. It means being integrated into the crew with leadership roles, with collateral duties, and with a qualification path to watches that are critical to the ship’s mission. It means camaraderie and connection with one crew and one ship. His simple words touched me deeply.

U.S. Senator Jeanne Shaheen christens the USS Manchester (LCS 14) at Austal’s Mobile, AL facility. (Photo Credit: Austal)

U.S. Senator Jeanne Shaheen christens the USS Manchester (LCS 14) at Austal’s Mobile, AL facility. (Photo Credit: Austal)

Any leader who has been in the Navy long enough to do many “check-in interviews” with newly-reporting Sailors knows instinctively why our nation’s citizens volunteer to join the Navy. They want to be part of something bigger than themselves. They want to be part of crew, a team with a mission. They want to be valued.

Over the years, I’ve always remembered a saying on the placards that hung in two of my former captains’ staterooms: “Bloom where you are planted.”

It’s a lesson I learned over and over with each new assignment. Now that I am in command, given this rare opportunity with the crew-det merger, I have one message for the Sailors of MCM Det 5, and for all Sailors everywhere with the honor and privilege to serve in our country’s Navy: you belong here.

 

Editor’s note: Commander Emily Bassett and her crew are expected to be the on-hull crew for USS Manchester (LCS 14)’s commissioning in 2018.

February 24, 2017 / iDriveWarships

Surface Navy Remembers Medal of Honor Recipients (Part 7)

The U.S. Navy is the greatest Navy the world has ever known – and we intend to keep it that way! To remain the preeminent maritime force, we are dedicated to investing now to produce a more effective and more lethal Surface Force for the future. That means adding ships to the fleet – and while we design for the future, we draw inspiration from the past when we choose bold names for them.

As part of his position, former Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus had the privilege of naming new vessels. In his nearly eight-year tenure, he has selected many monikers, including nine honoring Medal of Honor recipients. These American heroes, whose valiant acts and names represent the fighting spirit desired in a ship, earned the esteemed award through various acts of bravery and sacrifice. This week, as we wrap up this series, we remember the courageous men behind the future USS John Basilone, the future USS Jack H. Lucas, and the future USS Louis H. Wilson Jr.

WASHINGTON (Aug. 16, 2016) A photo illustration announcing that Arleigh-Burke class destroyer, DDG 124, will be named USS John Basilone. (U.S. Navy Photo Illustration/Released)

A photo illustration of the future USS John Basilone (DDG 122). (U.S. Navy Photo Illustration/Released)

The future USS John Basilone (DDG 122) honors U.S. Marine Sergeant John Basilone. During fierce battle action against enemy Japanese forces in Lunga Area, Guadalcanal, Solomon Islands on Oct. 24-25, 1942, one of the two heavy machine gun sections he was in charge of was put out of action. Basilone immediately put another gun into position and into action. He then repaired and manned a separate gun until replacements arrived. Later when American gunners’ ammunition grew critically low and supply lines were cut off, Basilone battled his way through hostile lines to deliver replenishment rounds which directly contributed in the neutralization of a Japanese regiment.

WASHINGTON (Aug. 30, 2016) A graphic representation of the future USS Jack H. Lucas (DDG 125). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Armando Gonzales/Released) 160830-N-LV331-005

WASHINGTON (Aug. 30, 2016) A graphic representation of the future USS Jack H. Lucas (DDG 125). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Armando Gonzales/Released) 160830-N-LV331-005

The future USS Jack H. Lucas (DDG 125) honors the youngest U.S. Marine and service member in World War II to receive the Medal of Honor. During the Battle of Iwo Jima, then Private 1st Class Jacklyn Harold Lucas and three others were ambushed by hostile forces and attacked by enemies using rifle fire and hand-grenades. Lucas selflessly hurled himself upon a grenade and pulled the other under him in order to absorb the blasts and shield his comrades. One grenade didn’t detonate and the other merely caused non-fatal wounds. His inspiring act protected his fellow Marines and enabled them to go on to rout the Japanese patrol and continue the advance.

WASHINGTON (Aug. 30, 2016) A graphic representation of the future USS Louis H. Wilson Jr. (DDG 126). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Armando Gonzales/Released) 160830-N-LV331-004

WASHINGTON (Aug. 30, 2016) A graphic representation of the future USS Louis H. Wilson Jr. (DDG 126). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Armando Gonzales/Released) 160830-N-LV331-004

The future USS Louis H. Wilson Jr. (DDG 126) honors U.S. Marine Corps General Louis H. Wilson Jr. for heroic actions during the World War II Battle of Guam in July 1944. Then a captain and commanding officer of a rifle company, Wilson led his men in taking and holding a hill against enormous odds. Although wounded three times, he fought against counterattacks throughout the night. During the epic 10-hour fight, he took part in fierce hand-to-hand combat and made a dash into open space beyond the frontlines to rescue a wounded Marine. Wilson later lead a 17-man patrol in taking a strategic slope essential to the security of their position and, despite losing 13 fellow soldiers, seized the objective. He was promoted to the rank of General on July 1, 1975, and assumed the office of commandant of the Marine Corps.

With inspirational namesakes like these, the Surface Force of the future is off to a great start – for surely the crews that man such ships will embody the fighting spirits of their namesakes as they stand ready with the ability to impose local maritime superiority when and where needed.

We hope you’ve enjoyed our entire ‘Surface Navy Remembers Medal of Honor Recipients’ series and took pleasure in learning about each of the 28 heroic men whose indomitable spirits live on, at least in part, through our mighty surface warships named in their honor.

February 17, 2017 / iDriveWarships

Sea Control: The need and the Surface Force Strategy necessity

 

America is, and always has been, a maritime nation. Today, just like centuries before, the oceans are the key to our influence, our security and our prosperity. As the global economy continues to expand and become more connected, the U.S. Navy, and specifically the Naval Surface Force’s ability to exert sea control when necessary – from the open ocean trade routes to the to the shallow littorals along continental coastlines, is vital to maintaining the free flow of goods over the world’s oceans and, ultimately, the economic stability of many countries. For the United States, with 25 percent of all U.S. jobs being directly or indirectly tied to global trade, sea control is a must.

That being said, the global maritime security environment has entered a complex time where threats to navigational freedom are being presented in a broad array – from low-end piracy to well-armed non-state militant groups, as well as sophisticated adversaries being determined, at times, to unlawfully rule certain regions and resources.

So given this shift in the environment, how do we achieve and sustain sea control when necessary to protect the oceans – the lifeblood of the interconnected global community?

SAN DIEGO (Feb. 14, 2017) Vice Adm. Tom Rowden, commander, Naval Surface Forces, speaks to hundreds of Sailors about the Surface Force Strategy (SFS) at an all hands call in the theater on Naval Base San Diego. SFS provides the Surface Force with an overarching strategy and direction to achieve and sustain sea control in order to protect the homeland from afar, build and maintain global security, project the national power of the United States, and win decisively. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Phil Ladouceur/Released) 170214-N-DX349-068

SAN DIEGO (Feb. 14, 2017) Vice Adm. Tom Rowden, commander, Naval Surface Forces, speaks to hundreds of Sailors about the Surface Force Strategy (SFS) at an all hands call in the theater on Naval Base San Diego. SFS provides the Surface Force with an overarching strategy and direction to achieve and sustain sea control in order to protect the homeland from afar, build and maintain global security, project the national power of the United States, and win decisively. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Phil Ladouceur/Released) 170214-N-DX349-068

This week, Commander, Naval Surface Forces, Vice Admiral Tom Rowden addressed this issue with Sailors and Marines Forces of the San Diego waterfront as he spoke to the merits of the recently released Surface Force Strategy. The strategy maps out Surface Forces’ return to sea control and provides more substance to the organizing and operating principle of Distributed Lethality.

“If you’re going to control the sea you’re going to do it with ships because ships bring capacity and capability. Existential threats to the United States of America are going to come from countries who are trying to control the sea,” said Rowden.

He began the conversation with a brief history discussion of how our current maritime environment was shaped – from the end of the Cold War to supporting the recent conflicts in the Middle East.

“By 1992, the Soviet Union has ceased to exist. It’s dissolved and all of their submarines, ships and aircraft were tied up to the pier. And so, almost overnight, we woke up and we had this thing that had eluded us for decades – we had sea control. We had it in the Eastern Pacific, the Western Pacific, in the Indian Ocean, in the Arabian Gulf, the Mediterranean. We had it everywhere,” said Rowden.

In the following decades, without an enduring threat to sea control, the U.S. Navy did what it does best, and that is to adapt to the strategic environment. Just as the visionaries of the ‘70’s saw that the Soviets could be pressured by offensive sea power, a new group of visionaries saw that the mobility, flexibility, and endurance of naval forces—compounded by the revolution in precision guided weapons—could act as a powerful enabler of the Joint, multi-domain fight.

“We were afforded the luxury of being able to shift our emphasis, shift our investments to power projection ashore. So, over the years, we adjusted the flight deck of our aircraft carriers quite appropriately. We adjusted the armament on our ships, we started to look differently at surface ships,” said Rowden.

screen-shot-2016-09-08-at-1-42-17-pm

Graphic depicting a possible distributed lethality inspired formation of surface ships (blue) spread out in juxtaposition to an adversaries possible formation.

While participating in a series of high-level war game exercises several years ago, Rowden realized that decades of deemphasizing sea control meant the fleet had concentrated the lethality of the force on to the flight decks of our aircraft carriers. Consequently, the opposing force in the exercise focused almost exclusively on trying to kill the aircraft carrier and end its power projection abilities. Rowden’s response to their efforts was to successfully distribute his force of Littoral Combat Ships and go on the offensive – using these ships in an unforeseen manner to attack the opposing combatant ships. This immediately changed the adversary’s strategy and how they operated their ships.

His success during the exercise may have been the genesis for a multi-year effort to develop the new Surface Force Strategy, as Rowden reconsidered how naval forces might be better employed.

“I asked myself ‘Why don’t we distribute the lethality of the force back to the Surface Forces, back to the sea control assets, in order to complicate the problem for the adversary with respect to how it is they’re going to execute operations at sea, and perhaps even more important for their government, force them to invest differently,’” said Rowden, “How do we do this? We came up with this great concept called Distributed Lethality.”

Could the U.S. Navy make adjustments to existing weapons systems to go on the offensive?

The Missile Defense Agency and sailors aboard USS John Paul Jones (DDG 53), an Aegis baseline 9.C1 equipped destroyer, successfully fired a salvo of two SM-6 Dual I missiles against a complex medium-range ballistic missile target, demonstrating the Sea Based Terminal endo-atmospheric defensive capability and meeting the test's primary objective.(Missile Defense Agency photo via DVIDS)

The Missile Defense Agency and sailors aboard USS John Paul Jones (DDG 53), an Aegis baseline 9.C1 equipped destroyer, successfully fired a salvo of two SM-6 Dual I missiles against a complex medium-range ballistic missile target, demonstrating the Sea Based Terminal endo-atmospheric defensive capability and meeting the test’s primary objective.(Missile Defense Agency photo via DVIDS)

The short answer was yes – by modifying a number of defensive weapons to also serve an offensive purpose, retrofitting ships to handle those capabilities, and backfitting various current computing systems to work on older IT infrastructure to enhance their capabilities, the lethality of surface ships was quickly enhanced. These improvements force an adversary operating at sea to not only calculate for the capabilities of the aircraft carriers, but now also the enhanced offensive capability of all U.S. Navy warships at sea.

“Distribution of lethality is not necessarily about distributing the lethality of the force for the sake of distributing lethality. It’s distributing lethality of the force to enable sea control. That’s why the title of the Surface Force Strategy is ‘The Return to Sea Control.’ People read the strategy and they go, ‘Did we ever lose it?’ I don’t know. But we’re certainly facing more challenges,” said Rowden.

He explained that while surface ships will play a huge role in the Navy’s return to sea control they’re not the only players on our team.

“This is not all about surface ships. This is about the combined capability of submarines, aircraft, aircraft carriers, and warships and the men and women who operate them. This is about making everybody more lethal and understanding that we’re headed into a fight for sea control. It’s not about controlling all the sea, all the time. You need to control the sea, you need to control, for the amount of time you need to control it, and then relinquish control [at your choosing].”

Ultimately, the Surface Force Strategy was created to help the Sailors carrying out the sea control mission and Rowden intends to do everything within his power to ensure they are combat ready.

He told the crowd, “As we talk about the organizing principle of Distributed Lethality, as we talk about the return to sea control and the driving investments associated with that, we’re starting to see some big payoff. This is all about YOU and making sure you have the talent, the tools, the tactics, and the training in order to get the job done!”

 

February 10, 2017 / iDriveWarships

Diversity in the Surface Force Gathering Talent, Getting Stronger

 

111207-N-KD852-078_CRP-3-2By Naval Surface Force, U.S. Pacific Fleet Public Affairs

As the surface warfare community continues to evolve – leveraging new technologies and operating concepts in order to remain the world’s most effective, persistent, and resilient surface navy – we realize our greatest strength comes from being able to appropriately cultivate and focus the talents of our Sailors. Individually, each brings something unique to the fight; together, they enable all of our community’s many successes.

Recently, Surface Force leadership had an opportunity to meet with Chief of Naval Personnel staff for an annual Strategic Workforce Assessment. This review allows us to improve our understanding of community demographics, challenges, and workforce strategies, as well as help shape policy, strategy, and program execution. Ultimately, these assessments help us bolster the Navy’s inclusive culture and diverse team.

“I fully expect all levels of Surface Force leadership to recognize existing diversity biases and actively work to eliminate their influence on our ability to recruit, promote, and retain the best military and civilian warfighters,” said Vice Admiral Tom Rowden, commander, Naval Surface Forces, when addressing this critical personnel readiness issue.

An inculcation of the “power of diversity” across the surface enterprise throughout the last two decades has put the surface community on a positive path toward bringing real equality to the opportunities available for all in the surface fleet. Our 15-year trend of increased female accession, our 13-year trend of increased diversity for senior officers, and our 12-year trend of increased diversity throughout surface force enlisted ranks are all demonstrative of our commitment to recognizing and recruiting talent across the nation’s population.

SUVA, Fiji (Jan. 27, 2017) Ensign Christa Ratcliff, from Dallas, stands at parade rest as the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Michael Murphy (DDG 112) pulls into Suva, Fiji. Michael Murphy is on a scheduled western Pacific deployment with the Carl Vinson Carrier Strike Group as part of the U.S. Pacific Fleet-led initiative to extend the command and control functions of U.S. 3rd Fleet. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Danny Kelley/Released) 170127-N-PP996-018

SUVA, Fiji (Jan. 27, 2017) Ensign Christa Ratcliff, from Dallas, stands at parade rest as the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Michael Murphy (DDG 112) pulls into Suva, Fiji. Michael Murphy is on a scheduled western Pacific deployment with the Carl Vinson Carrier Strike Group as part of the U.S. Pacific Fleet-led initiative to extend the command and control functions of U.S. 3rd Fleet. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Danny Kelley/Released) 170127-N-PP996-018

With this information in mind, it is important for the surface community to create a culture that is welcoming, challenging, and rewarding for all – we must respect the fact that we are in competition with Fortune 500 companies to attract and retain talent.

In 2007, then Chief of Naval Operations Admiral Mike Mullen issued guidance focusing on execution, in which he said, “Diversity is a leadership issue, and everyone is a leader. Through our communications, education, policies, programs and conduct, each of us must actively foster environments where people are valued, respected, and provided the opportunity to reach their full personal and professional potential.”

The surface community is proud of the work it has done to promote deserving mentors and role models for the young diverse talent entering the community. As an example, we have outstanding female role models serving throughout the Navy’s ranks; from the Navy’s highest-ranking woman, Admiral Michelle Howard wearing three leadership hats – as commander, Allied Joint Force Command Naples, commander, U.S. Naval Forces Europe and commander, U.S. Naval Forces Africa – to all but two of our surface ships having female leadership in their chief petty officer ranks.

In the surface warfare officer ranks, the quality of leadership provided by the female contingent is extraordinary. In total we have three active-duty flag-level officers who have blazed a trail, and smashed a few stereotypes along the way – lodestars for so many behind them. And following not too far behind are the next generations of high-performance officers. We have 15 females currently serving as commanders-at-sea (and 11 more in fleet-up tours), 82 women selected for command-at-sea, 25 percent of year group 2008 being retained for department head roles, and year group 2016 being the largest female accessioning in the community’s history.

That being said, the entire surface force still has the responsibility to lean forward. We must address and overcome obstacles to allow surface Sailors to reach their full personal and professional potential. Particularly pertinent to the female ranks is the goal of achieving full integration across all platforms, demonstrating continued retention growth, and maintaining strong female enlisted khaki representation at all levels. The community has come a long way, but there is still much to be covered.

ATLANTIC OCEAN (Sept. 24, 2015) Cmdr. Gilbert Clark, executive officer of the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS The Sullivans (DDG 68), directs Ensign Christian Diaz as he monitors the course indicator during a replenishment-at-sea training exercise. The Sullivans is participating in Joint Warrior, a United Kingdom-led, multinational cooperative training exercise designed to prepare NATO and allied forces for global operations. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Daniel Gaither/Released) 150924-N-OX430-106

ATLANTIC OCEAN (Sept. 24, 2015) Cmdr. Gilbert Clark, executive officer of the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS The Sullivans (DDG 68), directs Ensign Christian Diaz as he monitors the course indicator during a replenishment-at-sea training exercise. The Sullivans is participating in Joint Warrior, a United Kingdom-led, multinational cooperative training exercise designed to prepare NATO and allied forces for global operations. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Daniel Gaither/Released) 150924-N-OX430-106

In his recently released strategy document, “Return to Sea Control,” Rowden puts heavy emphasis on managing, “the extraordinary talent that exists within our surface force with a view towards building depth, breadth, and experience for the future.” He goes on to say that “tomorrow’s challenges demand we engage the most creative and influential minds and attract and retain the best and most qualified people.”

Warfighting excellence in the surface fleet can only be optimized when we fully respect the dignity of every individual, incorporate their talent into our planning processes, and value the time and skills they invest with us. Diversity allows different viewpoints to be put on the table when addressing issues and promotes a culture of critical thinking. We demand a warfighting spirit; our Sailors deserve the proper resources, tools, and training necessary for mission accomplishment!

 

 

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